Semmelweis Lectures

Amstedam 2016

Technical Innovation in Infection
Lucien Engelen

The healthcare industry faces more challenges than ever before: shortage of skilled personnel, a rising demand for healthcare services, and healthcare budgets that are under significant pressure. At the same time, the influence of exponential growth in technology and the changing attitude of patients result in changing patient care models. Lucien Engelen (1962) has worked since 2007 at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre as Head of the regional emergency healthcare network. He also advises the Board in terms of changes in healthcare enhancing the participation of the patients and their informal care in their own disease, working towards raising the level of participation in Health(care), research and education. He is founding Director of the Radboud REshape Center,that acts on the convergence of technology and patient empowerment. Creating breakthrough programs, foresights and products if industry lacks progression itself. Furthermore Lucien is Chief Imagineer at the Dutch National IT Institute for Healthcare NICTIZ, he is core Faculty at the Singularity University Exponential Medicine (formerly known as FutureMed) in Silicon Valley (founded by i.e. Google, NASA, Autodes). He was named one of the initial 150 world thought leaders and therefore invited to blog on LinkedIn Today as part of the influencers program (600.000+ followers as of January 2016).

Porto 2015

Preventing infection by employing cutting edge nanotechnology
Lars Montelius, Lund, Sweden
Preventing infection by employing cutting-edge nanotechnology creating local, portable, highly-flexible and intelligent sterile air-zones delivering optimal performance and reproducibility for enhanced care & health.

Vienna 2014

Negotiating Truth: Semmelweis, Discourse on Hand Hygiene and Politics of Emotions
Anna Durnova, Vienna, Austria
Lecture script     Slides

Prague 2013

Global reduction of surgical infections from WHO perspective
Benedetta Allegranzi, Geneva, Switzerland

Lund, Sweden, June 14-16, 2012

Control of surgical infections in the 21st century
Stig Bengmark, Lund, Sweden
Lecture script     Slides

Abstract

The microbiota of Westerners is significantly reduced in comparison to rural individuals living a similar lifestyle to our Paleolithic forefathers but also to that of other free-living primates such as the chimpanzee. The great majority of ingredients in the industrially produced foods consumed in the West are absorbed in the upper part of small intestine and thus of limited benifit to the microbiota. Lack of proper nutrition for microbiota is a major factor under-pinning dysfunctional microbiota, dysbiosis, chronically elevated inflammation, and the production and leakage of endotoxins through the various tissue barriers. Furthermore, the over comsumption of insulinogenic foods and proteotoxins, such as advanced glycation and lipoxidation molecules, gluten and zein, and a reduced intake of fruit and vegetables, are key factors behind the commonly observed elevated inflammation and the endemic of obesity and chronic diseases, factors which are also likely to be detrimental to microbiota. As a consequence… Read More

Leon, Spain, May 25-28, 2011
Solving the problem of sepsis by understanding microbial decision making
John J. Alverdy, Chicago, USA
Munich, March 9-13, 2010
Surgical Research, Clinical studies and Quality of Science: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Eugen Faist, Munich, Germany
Chicago, May 6 - 9, 2009
Infection and immunosuppression in laparoscopic surgery
Miguel A. Cuesta, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Antalya, May 1 - 3, 2008
Inspiration from a Scientific Society: An institutional achievement
Iskender Sayek, Istanbul, Turkey
Frankfurt, May 17-19, 2007
The challenge of antibiotic resistance – How to combat?
Thomas A. Wichelhaus, Frankfurt, Germany
Athens, May 25 - 28, 2006
The Surgeon: An Immunomodulator
Jonathan Meakins, Oxford, UK
Miami Beach, May 5 - 7, 2005
Problem Wounds, Infection, and Surgery Finn Gottrup, Odense, Denmark
Cork, June 17 - 19, 2004
Prevention of Infection Following Colorectal Surgery
Donald Fry, Albuquerque, USA
Como, May 29 - 31, 2003
Immunodysregulation associated with systemic inflammation
Jean-Marc Cavaillon, Paris, France
Madrid, May 2 - 4, 2002
Injury induced Immune dysfunction: Is the Lymphocyte irrelevant?
John Mannick, Boston USA
Gdansk, May 31 - June 2, 2001
Vancomycin – resistant enterococci
Marc Bonten, Utrecht, Netherlands
Nijmegen, May 25 - 27, 2000
Sepsis research: What did we do wrong? What would Semmelweis do now?
Arthur E. Baue, New York, USA
Oslo, June 3 - 5, 1999
Necrotising fascitis and severe streptoccocal infections
Jonathan Cohen, London, England
London, May 15 - 16, 1998
Post – trauma oxygen debt as a determinat of fulminant ARDS and septic respiratory failure
John H. Siegel, Newark, USA
Istambul, May 29 - 31, 1997
Immunology and the Surgeon
Jonathan L. Meakins, Montreal, Canada
Paris, May 30 - June 1, 1996
Severe Peritonitis: Evolution of the surgical treatment
R. Parc, Paris, France
Freiburg, June 8 - 10, 1995
Antibiotic treatment in compromised patients may soon become less sucessful because of multiresistence
D van der.Waaij, Groningen, The Netherlands
Vienna, May 26 - 28, 1994
Lessons from lavage and colonic trauma
Lynne W. Baker, Durban, South Africa
Varese, June 3 - 5, 1993
Facts and fantasy in surgical infection control
F. Daschner, Freiburg, Germany
Santiago, June 8 - 10 1992
Cadaverous particles and infection in injured man
Basil A. Pruitt, San Antonio, USA
Athens, May 24 - 25, 1991
Viruses and Surgeons
Robert E. Condon, Milwaukee, USA
Antwerp, June 8 - 9, 1990
The integrated management of intraperitoneal sepsis
Miles Irving, Manchester, England
Geneva, June 2 - 3, 1989
Surgical Infection: A Historical Appraisal
R.J.A. Goris, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Amsterdam, June 2 - 3, 1988
Immunology and Surgery
Allan Pollock, Scarborough, England